Town Services

School & Community Library

School & Community Library
Queen Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2523

Swimming Pool

Peterborough Swimming Pool
Grove Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2328

Police Station

Police Station
Jervois Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2100

Steamtown Rail Heritage Centre

Steamtown Rail Heritage Centre
Roundhouse, Railway Terrace PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3355

Tourist Information Centre

Tourist Information Centre
Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2708

Service Clubs

Peterborough RSL

Peterborough RSL
108 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3055

Sport & Recreational Clubs

Japan Karate Association

Japan Karate Association
Peterborough Primary School Government Road PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 0429 168 298
Tuesday & Thursday 6 pm - 7.30 pm

Peterborough Bowling Club Inc

Peterborough Bowling Club Inc
Kitchener Strteet PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2425

Peterborough Golf Club

Peterborough Golf Club
Park Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone:8651 2012

Education

Peterborough High School

Peterborough High School
Queen Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2306

Peterborough Primary School

Peterborough Primary School
75 Bridges Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2102

St Joseph's School

St Joseph's School
Burke Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2449

TAFE

TAFE
PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2723

Medical

Mid North Health  Hospital

Mid North Health Hospital
23 Hurlstone Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 0400

Peterborough Medical Centre

Peterborough Medical Centre
23 Hurlstone Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2406

S A Dental Service

S A Dental Service
Victoria Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2736

Spencer Gulf Podiatry

Spencer Gulf Podiatry
23 Hurlstone Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 0400

Accommodation

Peggy's Retreat

Peggy's Retreat
MANNANARIE . Phone: 0427 196 991

Peterborough Caravan Park

Peterborough Caravan Park
36 Grove Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2545
www.peterboroughsa.com.au

Peterborough Federal Hotel

Peterborough Federal Hotel
96 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2197

Peterborough Golden Chain Motor Inn

Peterborough Golden Chain Motor Inn
25 Queen Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2078

Peterborough Hotel

Peterborough Hotel
195 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3062

Peterborough Junction Hotel

Peterborough Junction Hotel
121 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2195

Peterborough Motel

Peterborough Motel
2a Railway Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2006

Peterborough Motorcycle & Antique Museum Bed & Breakfast

Peterborough Motorcycle & Antique Museum Bed & Breakfast
Tennyson Hall . Corner Kitchener & Jervois Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 0432 873 660

Peterborough Railway Hotel

Peterborough Railway Hotel
221 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 86512427

Abattoirs

Metro Velda Pty Ltd

Metro Velda Pty Ltd
7 Cotton Road PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2305

Accountants

Jeff M Weeks

Jeff M Weeks
88 Railway Terrace PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 8651 2711

Auto Engineers & Repairers

Repco Auto Repair

Repco Auto Repair
PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3123

Compass Motors

Compass Motors
115 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 088651 2610

Peterborough Auto Repair

Peterborough Auto Repair
3 Silver Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2004

Banks

BankSA

BankSA
155 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3387

Building Contractors & Materials

4 K Construction

4 K Construction
PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3243

Cabinet Makers

Peterborough Cabinet Makers

Peterborough Cabinet Makers
233 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2255

Cafes & Restaurants

229 on Main

229 on Main
229 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3058

Greenlight Bistro

Greenlight Bistro
123 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2926

Peterborough Acafe

Peterborough Acafe
179 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2288

Take a Break Coffee Shop

Take a Break Coffee Shop
151 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2038

Churches

Anglican Church of Australia

Anglican Church of Australia
55 Kitchener Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3157

Assemblies of God

Assemblies of God
Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3143

Catholic Church

Catholic Church
52 Railway Terrace PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2008

Salvation Army

Salvation Army
Kitchener Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3155

Uniting Church in Australia

Uniting Church in Australia
58 South Terrace PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3050

Cinemas

Statewide Cinema

Statewide Cinema
PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8650 3286

Creative Services

J M Creative Services

J M Creative Services
PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 0423 513 200
email: designs@JMCSOnline.com

Driving Schools

Mid North Driving School

Mid North Driving School
PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 0428 899 646

Excavating & Earthmoving

S & E Polomka Pty Ltd

S & E Polomka Pty Ltd
267 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2095

Furniture Removals

Peterborough Antiques & Removals

Peterborough Antiques & Removals
233 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2729

Marriage Celebrants

Katherine Badenoch

Katherine Badenoch
120 Hill Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2502

Monumental Masons

D R Cooks Monumental Works

D R Cooks Monumental Works
Cnr Main & Edith Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2211

Real Estate

Elders Ltd

Elders Ltd
113 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2021
Fax: 08 8651 2676 Mobile: 0412 863 243

Landmark

Landmark
Jeff & Gerda Oakley
93 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2009
Fax 8651 2604 Mobile: 0427 188 316

Wardle & Co

Wardle & Co
367 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 0407 362 105

Retail

Australia Post

Australia Post
164 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2020

Bear's Barn

Bear's Barn
42-44 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2208
Fax: 08 8651 2086 A/H: 0418 891 744 email bearsbarn@internode.on.net
8.30 am - 4.00 pm Mon - Fri 8.30 am - 11.30 am Saturday

Cave's Furniture Showroom

Cave's Furniture Showroom
157 - 159 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2230

Coloutrix Hair & Beauty

Coloutrix Hair & Beauty
147 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3383

Down to Earth Galleries

Down to Earth Galleries
PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2549 Email dteg@dteg242.net

Flavels Hardware & Rural Supplies

Flavels Hardware & Rural Supplies
42 - 44 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2208

Foodland

Foodland
171 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2506

Mercers Meat Supply

Mercers Meat Supply
143 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2031

My Emporium

My Emporium
181 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2416

Pelwit Promotions Pty Ltd Engraving

Pelwit Promotions Pty Ltd Engraving
201 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2822

Peterborough Home Hardware

Peterborough Home Hardware
131 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2303

Peterborough Antiques & Removals

Peterborough Antiques & Removals
233 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2729

Peterborough Laundromat

Peterborough Laundromat
Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2873 Mobile: 0434 082 129
9 am - 6.30 pm 7 days

Peterborough Newsagency

Peterborough Newsagency
185 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2137
8 am - 5 pm Monday - Friday, 8 am - 11.30 am Saturday, Sunday and Public Holidays

Peterborough Pharmacy

Peterborough Pharmacy
211 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2688

Peterborough Shoe & Sports Store

Peterborough Shoe & Sports Store
177 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2077

Peterborough Video & Electrical

Peterborough Video & Electrical
201 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 2822
Open 7 days

The Sewing Nook

The Sewing Nook
161 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3399

Stairway to Heaven

Stairway to Heaven
149 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3275

Self Storage

Sambec Storage

Sambec Storage
34 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8531 2160 Fax: 08 8531 3872
Email: chris@sambecsheds.com.au

Service Stations

Peterborough Service Station

Peterborough Service Station
92 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8651 3222
Open 7 days

Taxis

Peterborough Taxi Service

Peterborough Taxi Service
164 Main Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 0407 513 002

Tyres

G & C Tyrepower

G & C Tyrepower
43 Kitchener Street PETERBOROUGH . Phone: (freecall) 13 21 91 Fax: 08 8651 2942

Veterinary Services

Geoff Warren Veterinary Clinic

Geoff Warren Veterinary Clinic
PETERBOROUGH . Phone: 08 8664 1614

Signs on the Four Main Roads into Peterborough

THE UNEMPLOYED AT PETERSBURG.

[By Telegraph]

...The men who arrived at Petersburg yesterday morning were provided with a week's rations upon credit last night, and a few who had nothing but what they stood in were charitably provided with blankets and rugs by one or two residents. The case of several appears to have been deplorable. Those who had no blankets stated that they had left their only one at home to cover the wife and children.

After receiving their rations they were informed that they were to proceed to Mannahill next morning, and that two wagons and thirty drays were provided for their conveyance. They then asked about their pay, and upon being informed that they must report themselves upon the work at Mannahill before payment would commence for their services they unanimously refused to proceed. After negotiations Mr. Hack induced them to agree to go on, upon a promise that he would represent their case to the Commissioner. It is expected that it will take them four days to reach the works, which are 80 miles from Petersburg.

An additional fortnight's supplies are being conveyed with the party, and Mr. Hack has agreed, in view of the impecunious state of the men, to allow the payment for the first week's provisions to extend over four weeks.

Last night one of the men named Wooffe was run over by a dray during the darkness and his ankle hurt. It is not yet known whether the bone is broken.

Peterborough, on the Barrier Highway and well east of the Southern Flinders Ranges, is a substantial regional centre, very well presented on their website (opens in a new tab).

Peterborough, then Petersburg, has always been known as the railway centre and the article below describes its early days very well.

18 February 1914

PETERSBURG.

THE CAPITAL OF THE NORTH-EAST.

A DIP INTO HISTORY.

SPLENDID RECORD OF PROGRESS

(By our Special Reporter.)

The expansion of Petersburg, a town that has been aptly dubbed by his Excellency the Governor, "the Capital of the North-East," has not been strikingly rapid until the last decade. Founded more as the result of a combination of fortuitous circumstances than by premeditated design, it has, with the assistance of its position at the junction of four important railways, made a name for itself throughout Australia.

Its fine main streets of asphalt, its handsome new buildings, imposing line of shops, and, more than anything else, its electric lighting system, which was inaugurated on Monday, give it the status of a town quite abreast with the times.

Forty years ago Petersburg was not thought of. In 1876 Mr. J. H. Koch, whose farm still runs into the town to the very railway-station boundary, bought section 216 from Mr. Peter Doecke, with the object of farming there until he might retire to more comfortable parts. He had no thought that with the passage of years portion of his farm would give place to one of the two principal railway stations in South Australia.

One of the first proposals was that the narrow-gauge line, which had been built from Hamley Bridge through Brinkworth to Gladstone, should be continued through Jamestown and Yongala direct to Orroroo, and onward to Port Augusta, without touching Petersburg. That is, according to the réminiscences of several old residents of the district who knew Yongala before Petersburg had begun to spring up among the wheat fields, and who later looked upon what is now the junction township as a sort of suburb of Yongala.

Anyone who knows the two places will realise how the "suburb" has expanded and completely eclipsed the "metropolis." Yongala now has few pretensions beyond what a rural centre upon the railwav might be expected to have, but Petersburg has become a populous town and the hub of all the surrounding districts. Its business extends to Cockburn along one line of railway, to Laura in the opposite direction, northward to Hawker, and southward to Hallett.

Swarming with Kangaroos.

I had the pleasure of a few minutes' chat with Mr. Koch on Tuesday. "I came here in August, 1876," he said. "It was a wild place and kangaroo were swarming as the rabbits are now. Occasionally a swagman looked in but my neighbors were far away. Did I know there would be a big railway junction and township here? No, I simply proposed to farm. My farmhouse was about the only one here then, but three years afterwards the railway surveyors came from Jamestown and Terowie almost simultaneously. The first train I remember ran from Jamestown to Orroroo by way of Petersburg, but it was not long before the Terowie route was the established one between Adelaide and the North. As soon as the township began to spring up, about 1880, I named it Petersburg, after Peter Doecke. My house was built by Mr. Doecke. I recollect that the first building of any importance put up was Hall's Hotel, a single-storey building, on the site of the present Petersburg Hotel. When the Broken Hill line was built the town grew very quickly."

Mr. S. Kealey (town clerk), who was clerk of the Yongala District Council before Petersburg became a corporate town, explained that at one time it had been believed that Yongala was to be the junction of the Terowie and Jamestown lines, and a larger township than any then existing northern town was laid out, and blocks sold at high prices. Now blocks in Yongala, which had brought such considerable sums in the original sale, could be purchased for 30/- or £2 each. Petersburg had become the junction of the centre.

The Life-giving Railway.

Without the railway perhaps Petersburg would be non-existent still, but population follows the iron road, and therefore, possibly for that reason alone, Petersburg has become a highly important place.

No one is more ready to admit the value of the position of the town than are the townsfolk themselves. They are, however, making praiseworthy efforts to render the town independent, so that if by any possible chance the greater portion of the railway staff were withdrawn the business people would still be able to proceed.

Thus there is a butter factory which exports its produce to all parts of the State and overseas, a flour mill, two cordial manufactories, and two agricultural implement factories. Petersburg, it would seem, might easily become a manufacturing town, and the attempts enumerated above show that some, at least, of the residents realise that in secondary production is the solution of the problem how to secure the independence of the town from the railway.

It cannot remain a community of railway men; it must expand or it will decline. Through the station yard each day 36 heavily-freighted trains pass, mainly to and from the Barrier, and the line from Petersburg to Cockburn carries the heaviest traffic of any stretch of single track in the world. What would happen to Petersburg if the Barrier failed? The answer can be supplied by Petersburg people in what they do to make their town self-supporting.

Municipal Expansion.

The increase in population and the extension of the town have been far greater than any influx of railway men or increase of traffic could account for. There are 600 of the railway staff living in the town, but the population now totals 3,500. Therefore it can be seen that this prosperous community is moving for itself. In 1887, when the town was incorporated, the rates totalled £313. In 10 years the revenue of the corporation increased to £803, but the drought at the close of last century was a set-back, and by 1907 the amount was still slightly below £900. In 1911 the thousand had been passed, however, and the increase has been unprecedentedly rapid since then. In 1912 the rates were £1,340 and this year they will be £1,600. They have, indeed, nearly doubled in eight years.

Besides a large town hall and corporation offices, there are several well appointed hotels, a new State Savings Bank, and a branch of the English and Scottish Bank quite recently erected. There has been just added to the buildings of the down a bishop's palace, which cost £5,000, erected as the permanent residence of the Bishop of Port Augusta. Fully 30 private dwellings were erected in the town during the last 12 months, and the Railways Commissioner, in addition, put up 12 cottages for the staff.

Reminiscences.

At a social on Monday evening in connection with the switching on of the electric light several of the old residents spoke of the early days.

Councillor Bowering recalled the trip he had made over the line to Cockburn when it was opened. He also remembered how the district clerk of Yongala, of which Petersburg then was part, used to come to the embryo town, collect the rates, and go straight back to Yongala and plant trees there. (Laughter.)

Mr. H. Richards (chairman of the District Council or Coglin), after listening to several speeches, in which Petersburg people modestly stated what they had done, admitted that "nothing in-the Coglin district could come within coo-ee of the Petersburg main street." He was a "sheepy man," though, and he flung it at the Petersburg shopkeepers - who had to admit inferiority in sheep-raising - that he had "come in and taken the championship at the show."

Councillor Jamieson said Petersburg might go slowly, but it went surely. He contrasted the railway-station of to-day with that of the early days. "Thirty-three years ago," he said, "I brought a load of bark to the station. There were a station master and two porters there then, and the stationmaster (Mr. Short) said he was glad to have the stuff, as it would give, his staff something to do." (Laughter). Counc cillor Jamieson might have added that the stationmaster he referred to is now the Railways Commissioner of Western, Australia (Mr. J. T. Short).

The Eternal Question.

Everybody in the town seems to be oppressed by the fear that the Government will fail to provide an adequate water supply for Petersburg. They have been urging upon the Government for 20 years that action should be taken without delay, but still their hopes seem as far as ever from realisation. Though they are not engineers they have made suggestion upon suggestion, but before each proposal some apparently insuperable difficulty has arisen.

The strange thing is that the town on the northern side of the railway in the rainy season is often menaced by floods, and the electric light power station had to be built high up above the ground level so that the winter inundations would not interfere with the machinery.

Naturally, the residents thought that the flood waters should be conserved, "but," said one gentleman, "Mr. Bayer was the lion in the path, and when we were pressing the scheme home the partial drought began, and there was no heavy rain for three winters." So the floodwater scheme is pigeonholed pending the time when the streets will be awash again, though the three years' drought has rather weakened the conviction of the advocates of the scheme.

The late Hon. T. Price, it is said, promised that bores should be put down to search for artesian or sub-artesian supplies, but the Government stipulated that the town should pay part of the cost of the work, whereas "the town" considered that as the Government had provided water supplies for other places they should do the exploring for Petersburg.

Anyway, Petersburg is on high land - 1,800 ft. above sea level - and the Government Geologist has slight hopes that underground supplies will be found there. A scheme was mooted for impounding floodwater in Hennig's Lagoon, near Ucolta, but there again, when the discussion was in progress, the floods were few and far between.

It was suggested that water might be pumped from wells or from the Murray, but the Murray is 70 miles away, and both schemes would probably be too costly. The country between the river and the junction town is used mainly for grazing, and there would be no consumers on the pipe line to reduce the cost of the undertaking.

So Petersburg seems to be "up against it," as a resident said. But the question arises whether the residents should be left to solve the problem themselves, or whether it is not the province of the Government.

Some people in Petersburg have been buying water since November, 1912, and carters are retailing the precious fluid at 2/6 a hundred gallons. Surely in a town of 3,500 inhabitants, and at the biggest railway centre outside the metropolis - the railway dams, by the way, are leaky and nearly dry - this state of things should not be allowed to continue. It is the duty of engineers to overcome difficulties. It is not too much to demand that the Hydraulic Engineer and his staff should at all events exhaust their skill and knowledge in an endeavor to provide this important town with water. The rainfall at Petersburg is too uncertain for a growing town to depend upon supplies in underground tanks, caught from the roofs during showers, which may or may not be frequent.